IN SPACE - MAY 12: In this handout photo provided by NASA, This is the first image of Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole at the centre of our galaxy, with an added black background to fit wider screens. It's the first direct visual evidence of the presence of this black hole. It was captured by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), an array which linked together eight existing radio observatories across the planet to form a single Earth-sized virtual telescope. The telescope is named after the event horizon, the boundary of the black hole beyond which no light can escape.   The image of the Sgr A* black hole is an average of the different images the EHT Collaboration has extracted from its 2017 observations.  In addition to other facilities, the EHT network of radio observatories that made this image possible includes the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) in the Atacama Desert in Chile, co-owned and co-operated by ESO is a partner on behalf of its member states in Europe. (Photo by NASA Via Getty Images)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Astronomers have unveiled the first wild but fuzzy image of the supermassive black hole at the center of our own Milky Way galaxy. Nearly all galaxies, including our own, are believed to have these giant black holes at their center, where light and matter cannot escape. That makes it extremely hard to get pictures of them. The image released Thursday was made by eight synchronized radio telescopes around the world. This is not the first picture of a black hole. The same international group released the first one in 2019 from a distant galaxy.