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LAKE MEAD NATIONAL RECREATION AREA, AZ - MAY 12: A tall bleached 'bathtub ring' is visible behind the Hoover Dam on May 12, 2015 in Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Arizona. As severe drought grips parts of the Western United States, Lake Mead, which was once the largest reservoir in the nation, has seen its surface elevation drop below 1,080 feet above sea level, its lowest level since the construction of the Hoover Dam in the 1930s. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

A key reservoir on the Colorado River is expected to match its record low level on Thursday. The dropping surface elevation of Lake Mead along the Arizona-Nevada border is the another sign of the drought’s grip on the region. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation says the lake level is projected to continue falling until November, affecting recreation and hydropower efficiency. Already, water users in Arizona and Nevada are prepared to get less water in 2022 from the Colorado River. Millions of people in the U.S. West rely on the river that has been declining amid a prolonged drought and climate change.