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Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient

KDWN

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Food in countries hit by Ebola is getting more expensive and will become scarcer because many farmers won’t be able to access fields, a U.N. food agency warned Tuesday.

An Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 1,500 people, and authorities have cordoned off entire towns in an effort to halt the virus’ spread. Surrounding countries have closed land borders, many airlines have suspended flights to and from the affected countries and seaports are seeing less traffic, restricting food imports to the hardest-hit countries. Those countries – Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone – all rely on grain from abroad to feed their people, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization.

In one market in the Liberian capital of Monrovia, the price of cassava root, a staple in many West African diets, was up 150 percent.

“Even prior to the Ebola outbreak, households in some of the affected areas were spending up to 80 percent of their incomes on food,” said Vincent Martin, who is coordinating the agency’s response to the crisis. “Now these latest price spikes are effectively putting food completely out of their reach.”

The U.N. has said 1.3 million people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone will need help feeding themselves in coming months.

The situation looks likely worsen, FAO said, because restrictions on movement are preventing laborers from accessing farms, and the harvest of rice and corn is set to begin in a few weeks.

The World Health Organization is asking countries to lift border closures because they are preventing supplies from reaching people in desperate need. Ivory Coast decided Monday night to keep its borders with Guinea and Liberia closed but said it would open a humanitarian corridor to allow supplies in.

The world’s worst-ever Ebola outbreak has killed more than 1,500 people in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria.

Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient

KDWN

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Food in countries hit by Ebola is getting more expensive and will become scarcer because many farmers won’t be able to access fields, a U.N. food agency warned Tuesday.

An Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 1,500 people, and authorities have cordoned off entire towns in an effort to halt the virus’ spread. Surrounding countries have closed land borders, many airlines have suspended flights to and from the affected countries and seaports are seeing less traffic, restricting food imports to the hardest-hit countries. Those countries – Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone – all rely on grain from abroad to feed their people, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization.

In one market in the Liberian capital of Monrovia, the price of cassava root, a staple in many West African diets, was up 150 percent.

“Even prior to the Ebola outbreak, households in some of the affected areas were spending up to 80 percent of their incomes on food,” said Vincent Martin, who is coordinating the agency’s response to the crisis. “Now these latest price spikes are effectively putting food completely out of their reach.”

The U.N. has said 1.3 million people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone will need help feeding themselves in coming months.

The situation looks likely worsen, FAO said, because restrictions on movement are preventing laborers from accessing farms, and the harvest of rice and corn is set to begin in a few weeks.

The World Health Organization is asking countries to lift border closures because they are preventing supplies from reaching people in desperate need. Ivory Coast decided Monday night to keep its borders with Guinea and Liberia closed but said it would open a humanitarian corridor to allow supplies in.

The world’s worst-ever Ebola outbreak has killed more than 1,500 people in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria.

Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient

KDWN

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Food in countries hit by Ebola is getting more expensive and will become scarcer because many farmers won’t be able to access fields, a U.N. food agency warned Tuesday.

An Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 1,500 people, and authorities have cordoned off entire towns in an effort to halt the virus’ spread. Surrounding countries have closed land borders, many airlines have suspended flights to and from the affected countries and seaports are seeing less traffic, restricting food imports to the hardest-hit countries. Those countries – Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone – all rely on grain from abroad to feed their people, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization.

In one market in the Liberian capital of Monrovia, the price of cassava root, a staple in many West African diets, was up 150 percent.

“Even prior to the Ebola outbreak, households in some of the affected areas were spending up to 80 percent of their incomes on food,” said Vincent Martin, who is coordinating the agency’s response to the crisis. “Now these latest price spikes are effectively putting food completely out of their reach.”

The U.N. has said 1.3 million people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone will need help feeding themselves in coming months.

The situation looks likely worsen, FAO said, because restrictions on movement are preventing laborers from accessing farms, and the harvest of rice and corn is set to begin in a few weeks.

The World Health Organization is asking countries to lift border closures because they are preventing supplies from reaching people in desperate need. Ivory Coast decided Monday night to keep its borders with Guinea and Liberia closed but said it would open a humanitarian corridor to allow supplies in.

The world’s worst-ever Ebola outbreak has killed more than 1,500 people in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria.

Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient

KDWN

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — The U.N. is warning that food prices are rising in countries hit by Ebola and that it’ll get worse because many farmers won’t be able to access fields during the upcoming harvests of rice and corn.

An Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 1,500 people, and authorities have cordoned off entire towns in an effort to prevent the virus’ spread. Many airlines have suspended flights to and from the affected countries, and seaports are seeing less traffic.

The U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization said Tuesday that those measures drove up food prices as much as 150 percent in one market.

The U.N. has said 1.3 million people in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone will need help feeding themselves in coming months.

Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient

KDWN

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — The U.N. is warning that food prices are rising in countries hit by Ebola and that it’ll get worse because many farmers won’t be able to access fields during the upcoming harvests of rice and corn.

An Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 1,500 people, and authorities have cordoned off entire towns in an effort to prevent the virus’ spread. Many airlines have suspended flights to and from the affected countries, and seaports are seeing less traffic.

The U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization said Tuesday that those measures drove up food prices as much as 150 percent in one market.

The U.N. has said 1.3 million people in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone will need help feeding themselves in coming months.

Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient

KDWN

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Senegalese authorities on Monday were monitoring everyone who was in contact with a student infected with Ebola who crossed into the country, and who has lost three family members to the disease.

An Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 1,500 people in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria. The university student is Senegal’s first case of the dreaded disease.

The 21-year-old left Guinea on Aug. 15, just days after his brother died of the disease, according to Guinea’s Health Ministry. It said that the brother apparently caught Ebola in Sierra Leone.

The student traveled by road, crossing into Senegal despite a border closure. He arrived in Dakar, the Senegalese capital, on Aug. 20, according to the World Health Organization, and was staying with relatives on the outskirts of the city. The agency said that on Aug. 23, he went to a medical facility seeking treatment for fever, diarrhea and vomiting – all symptoms of Ebola but also many other diseases.

But he concealed from doctors that he had had contact with infected people. He was treated instead for malaria and continued to stay with his relatives before turning up at a Dakar hospital on Aug. 26.

Senegal’s Health Ministry said Sunday that it has since traced everyone the student came into contact with, and they are being examined twice a day.

President Macky Sall said Monday that everything is being done to prevent any further cases of the disease in Senegal, including public awareness campaigns and television programs aimed at encouraging good hygiene practices, like regularl hand-washing.

The Health Ministry in Guinea, meanwhile, said that since the young man left home, his mother and a sister have died of the disease, and two other brothers are being treated for it.

The arrival of the disease in Senegal, a tourist and transport hub, has raised fears that the disease could spread even farther afield.

But public health experts have said that shutting borders and banning flights are not the answer.

“Countries might try to restrict travel in order to protect themselves, and it will do the opposite,” said Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease and Control, during a visit to the airport in Conakry, Guinea, on Monday. “If we cut off these countries, we will interfere with our ability to support them and stop the outbreak and that will actually increase the risk to the rest of the world.”

The World Health Organization says up to 20,000 people may contract the virus and it could take at least six months to bring it under control.

On Monday, Liberia’s president ordered most civil servants to stay home another month in an effort to stop the disease’s spread.

President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf ordered non-essential workers not to come to work and promised that all government workers would still be paid. Liberia’s schools are also closed.

Associated Press journalists Jonathan Paye-Layleh in Monrovia, Liberia, and Youssouf Bah and Boubacar Diallo in Conakry, Guinea, contributed to this report.

Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient

KDWN

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Senegalese authorities on Monday were monitoring everyone who was in contact with a student infected with Ebola who crossed into the country, and who has lost three family members to the disease.

An Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 1,500 people in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria. The university student is Senegal’s first case of the dreaded disease.

The 21-year-old left Guinea on Aug. 15, just days after his brother died of the disease, according to Guinea’s Health Ministry. It said that the brother apparently caught Ebola in Sierra Leone.

The student traveled by road, crossing into Senegal despite a border closure. He arrived in Dakar, the Senegalese capital, on Aug. 20, according to the World Health Organization, and was staying with relatives on the outskirts of the city. The agency said that on Aug. 23, he went to a medical facility seeking treatment for fever, diarrhea and vomiting – all symptoms of Ebola but also many other diseases.

But he concealed from doctors that he had had contact with infected people. He was treated instead for malaria and continued to stay with his relatives before turning up at a Dakar hospital on Aug. 26.

Senegal’s Health Ministry said Sunday that it has since traced everyone the student came into contact with, and they are being examined twice a day.

President Macky Sall said Monday that everything is being done to prevent any further cases of the disease in Senegal, including public awareness campaigns and television programs aimed at encouraging good hygiene practices, like regularl hand-washing.

The Health Ministry in Guinea, meanwhile, said that since the young man left home, his mother and a sister have died of the disease, and two other brothers are being treated for it.

The arrival of the disease in Senegal, a tourist and transport hub, has raised fears that the disease could spread even farther afield.

But public health experts have said that shutting borders and banning flights are not the answer.

“Countries might try to restrict travel in order to protect themselves, and it will do the opposite,” said Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease and Control, during a visit to the airport in Conakry, Guinea, on Monday. “If we cut off these countries, we will interfere with our ability to support them and stop the outbreak and that will actually increase the risk to the rest of the world.”

The World Health Organization says up to 20,000 people may contract the virus and it could take at least six months to bring it under control.

On Monday, Liberia’s president ordered most civil servants to stay home another month in an effort to stop the disease’s spread.

President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf ordered non-essential workers not to come to work and promised that all government workers would still be paid. Liberia’s schools are also closed.

Associated Press journalists Jonathan Paye-Layleh in Monrovia, Liberia, and Youssouf Bah and Boubacar Diallo in Conakry, Guinea, contributed to this report.

Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient

KDWN

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Senegalese authorities on Monday were monitoring everyone who was in contact with a student infected with Ebola who crossed into the country, and who has lost three family members to the disease.

An Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 1,500 people in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria. The university student is Senegal’s first case of the dreaded disease.

The 21-year-old left Guinea on Aug. 15, just days after his brother died of the disease, according to Guinea’s Health Ministry. It said that the brother apparently caught Ebola in Sierra Leone.

The student traveled by road, crossing into Senegal despite a border closure. He arrived in Dakar, the Senegalese capital, on Aug. 20, according to the World Health Organization, and was staying with relatives on the outskirts of the city. The agency said that on Aug. 23, he went to a medical facility seeking treatment for fever, diarrhea and vomiting – all symptoms of Ebola but also many other diseases.

But he concealed from doctors that he had had contact with infected people. He was treated instead for malaria and continued to stay with his relatives before turning up at a Dakar hospital on Aug. 26.

Senegal’s Health Ministry said Sunday that it has since traced everyone the student came into contact with, and they are being examined twice a day.

President Macky Sall said Monday that everything is being done to prevent any further cases of the disease in Senegal, including public awareness campaigns and television programs aimed at encouraging good hygiene practices, like regularl hand-washing.

The Health Ministry in Guinea, meanwhile, said that since the young man left home, his mother and a sister have died of the disease, and two other brothers are being treated for it.

The arrival of the disease in Senegal, a tourist and transport hub, has raised fears that the disease could spread even farther afield.

But public health experts have said that shutting borders and banning flights are not the answer.

“Countries might try to restrict travel in order to protect themselves, and it will do the opposite,” said Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease and Control, during a visit to the airport in Conakry, Guinea, on Monday. “If we cut off these countries, we will interfere with our ability to support them and stop the outbreak and that will actually increase the risk to the rest of the world.”

The World Health Organization says up to 20,000 people may contract the virus and it could take at least six months to bring it under control.

On Monday, Liberia’s president ordered most civil servants to stay home another month in an effort to stop the disease’s spread.

President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf ordered non-essential workers not to come to work and promised that all government workers would still be paid. Liberia’s schools are also closed.

Associated Press journalists Jonathan Paye-Layleh in Monrovia, Liberia, and Youssouf Bah and Boubacar Diallo in Conakry, Guinea, contributed to this report.

Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient

KDWN

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Senegalese authorities on Monday were monitoring everyone who was in contact with a student infected with Ebola who crossed into the country, and who has lost three family members to the disease.

An Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 1,500 people in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria. The university student is Senegal’s first case of the dreaded disease.

The 21-year-old left Guinea on Aug. 15, just days after his brother died of the disease, according to Guinea’s Health Ministry. It said that the brother apparently caught Ebola in Sierra Leone.

The student traveled by road, crossing into Senegal despite a border closure. He arrived in Dakar, the Senegalese capital, on Aug. 20, according to the World Health Organization, and was staying with relatives on the outskirts of the city. The agency said that on Aug. 23, he went to a medical facility seeking treatment for fever, diarrhea and vomiting – all symptoms of Ebola but also many other diseases.

But he concealed from doctors that he had had contact with infected people. He was treated instead for malaria and continued to stay with his relatives before turning up at a Dakar hospital on Aug. 26.

Senegal’s Health Ministry said Sunday that it has since traced everyone the student came into contact with, and they are being examined twice a day.

President Macky Sall said Monday that everything is being done to prevent any further cases of the disease in Senegal, including public awareness campaigns and television programs aimed at encouraging good hygiene practices, like regularl hand-washing.

The Health Ministry in Guinea, meanwhile, said that since the young man left home, his mother and a sister have died of the disease, and two other brothers are being treated for it.

The arrival of the disease in Senegal, a tourist and transport hub, has raised fears that the disease could spread even farther afield.

But public health experts have said that shutting borders and banning flights are not the answer.

“Countries might try to restrict travel in order to protect themselves, and it will do the opposite,” said Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease and Control, during a visit to the airport in Conakry, Guinea, on Monday. “If we cut off these countries, we will interfere with our ability to support them and stop the outbreak and that will actually increase the risk to the rest of the world.”

The World Health Organization says up to 20,000 people may contract the virus and it could take at least six months to bring it under control.

On Monday, Liberia’s president ordered most civil servants to stay home another month in an effort to stop the disease’s spread.

President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf ordered non-essential workers not to come to work and promised that all government workers would still be paid. Liberia’s schools are also closed.

Associated Press journalists Jonathan Paye-Layleh in Monrovia, Liberia, and Youssouf Bah and Boubacar Diallo in Conakry, Guinea, contributed to this report.

Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient

KDWN

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Senegalese authorities on Monday were monitoring everyone who was in contact with a student infected with Ebola who crossed into the country, and who has lost three family members to the disease.

An Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 1,500 people in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria. The university student is Senegal’s first case of the dreaded disease.

The 21-year-old left Guinea on Aug. 15, just days after his brother died of the disease, according to Guinea’s Health Ministry. It said that the brother apparently caught Ebola in Sierra Leone.

The student traveled by road, crossing into Senegal despite a border closure. He arrived in Dakar, the Senegalese capital, on Aug. 20, according to the World Health Organization, and was staying with relatives on the outskirts of the city. The agency said that on Aug. 23, he went to a medical facility seeking treatment for fever, diarrhea and vomiting – all symptoms of Ebola but also many other diseases.

But he concealed from doctors that he had had contact with infected people. He was treated instead for malaria and continued to stay with his relatives before turning up at a Dakar hospital on Aug. 26.

Senegal’s Health Ministry said Sunday that it has since traced everyone the student came into contact with, and they are being examined twice a day.

President Macky Sall said Monday that everything is being done to prevent any further cases of the disease in Senegal, including public awareness campaigns and television programs aimed at encouraging good hygiene practices, like regularl hand-washing.

The Health Ministry in Guinea, meanwhile, said that since the young man left home, his mother and a sister have died of the disease, and two other brothers are being treated for it.

The arrival of the disease in Senegal, a tourist and transport hub, has raised fears that the disease could spread even farther afield.

But public health experts have said that shutting borders and banning flights are not the answer.

“Countries might try to restrict travel in order to protect themselves, and it will do the opposite,” said Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease and Control, during a visit to the airport in Conakry, Guinea, on Monday. “If we cut off these countries, we will interfere with our ability to support them and stop the outbreak and that will actually increase the risk to the rest of the world.”

The World Health Organization says up to 20,000 people may contract the virus and it could take at least six months to bring it under control.

On Monday, Liberia’s president ordered most civil servants to stay home another month in an effort to stop the disease’s spread.

President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf ordered non-essential workers not to come to work and promised that all government workers would still be paid. Liberia’s schools are also closed.

Associated Press journalists Jonathan Paye-Layleh in Monrovia, Liberia, and Youssouf Bah and Boubacar Diallo in Conakry, Guinea, contributed to this report.

Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient

KDWN

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Senegalese authorities on Monday were monitoring everyone who was in contact with a student infected with Ebola who crossed into the country, and who has lost three family members to the disease.

An Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 1,500 people in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria. The university student is Senegal’s first case of the dreaded disease.

The 21-year-old left Guinea on Aug. 15, just days after his brother died of the disease, according to Guinea’s Health Ministry. It said that the brother apparently caught Ebola in Sierra Leone.

The student traveled by road, crossing into Senegal despite a border closure. He arrived in Dakar, the Senegalese capital, on Aug. 20, according to the World Health Organization, and was staying with relatives on the outskirts of the city. The agency said that on Aug. 23, he went to a medical facility seeking treatment for fever, diarrhea and vomiting – all symptoms of Ebola but also many other diseases.

But he concealed from doctors that he had had contact with infected people. He was treated instead for malaria and continued to stay with his relatives before turning up at a Dakar hospital on Aug. 26.

Senegal’s Health Ministry said Sunday that it has since traced everyone the student came into contact with, and they are being examined twice a day.

President Macky Sall said Monday that everything is being done to prevent any further cases of the disease in Senegal, including public awareness campaigns and television programs aimed at encouraging good hygiene practices, like regularl hand-washing.

The Health Ministry in Guinea, meanwhile, said that since the young man left home, his mother and a sister have died of the disease, and two other brothers are being treated for it.

The arrival of the disease in Senegal, a tourist and transport hub, has raised fears that the disease could spread even farther afield.

But public health experts have said that shutting borders and banning flights are not the answer.

“Countries might try to restrict travel in order to protect themselves, and it will do the opposite,” said Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease and Control, during a visit to the airport in Conakry, Guinea, on Monday. “If we cut off these countries, we will interfere with our ability to support them and stop the outbreak and that will actually increase the risk to the rest of the world.”

The World Health Organization says up to 20,000 people may contract the virus and it could take at least six months to bring it under control.

On Monday, Liberia’s president ordered most civil servants to stay home another month in an effort to stop the disease’s spread.

President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf ordered non-essential workers not to come to work and promised that all government workers would still be paid. Liberia’s schools are also closed.

Associated Press journalists Jonathan Paye-Layleh in Monrovia, Liberia, and Youssouf Bah and Boubacar Diallo in Conakry, Guinea, contributed to this report.