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Doctor who contracted Ebola in grave condition

KDWN

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Kent Brantly always wanted to be a medical missionary, and he took the work seriously, spending months treating a steady stream of patients with Ebola in Liberia.

Now Brantly is himself a patient, fighting for his own survival in an isolation unit on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia, after contracting the deadly disease.

The Texas-trained doctor says he is “terrified” of the disease progressing further, according to Dr. David Mcray, the director of maternal-child health at John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, where Brantly completed a four-year residency.

“I’m praying fervently that God will help me survive this disease,” Brantly said in an email Monday to Mcray. He also asked that prayers be extended for Nancy Writebol, an American co-worker who also has fallen ill.

Brantly “went into Ebola exhausted” from treating Ebola patients, Mcray said after speaking with him Monday. His prognosis is grave and efforts to evacuate him to Europe for treatment have been thwarted because of concerns expressed by countries he would have to fly over en route to any European destination, Mcray said.

There is no known cure for Ebola, which begins with symptoms including fever and sore throat and escalates to vomiting, diarrhea and internal bleeding. The disease spreads through direct contact with blood and other bodily fluids as well as indirect contact with “environments contaminated with such fluids,” according to the World Health Organization.

Still, colleagues and family members said Brantly, 33, knew of the risks associated with working in one of the world’s poorest countries during an epidemic and did not regret his choice.

“Kent prepared himself to be a lifetime medical missionary,” said his mother, Jan Brantly. “His heart is in Africa.”

Last October, Brantly began a two-year fellowship with Samaritan’s Purse, a Christian aid group, to serve as a general practitioner, delivering babies and performing surgeries at a mission hospital in the Monrovia suburb of Paynseville.

When Ebola spread from neighboring Guinea into Liberia, Brantly and his wife, Amber, re-evaluated their commitment, but decided to stay in West Africa with their children, ages 3 and 5.

Brantly directed the hospital’s Ebola clinic, wearing full-body protective gear in the Equatorial heat for upward of three hours at a time to treat patients.

He undertook humanitarian work while studying medicine at Indiana University, working in impoverished, inner-city neighborhoods, according to a medical school spokeswoman.

During his four-year family medicine residency, he accompanied Mcray on medical missions to Uganda and earthquake-devastated Haiti. He also spent several weeks working in Tanzania, where a cousin lives and works as a medical missionary, Mcray said.

Before contracting Ebola, Brantly and his family “really enjoyed Liberia.”

“They were very well-adjusted,” said Ken Kauffeldt, the country director for Samaritan’s Purse in Monrovia.

Liberia’s health ministry is investigating how Brantly contracted the virus.

“We’re trying to figure out what went wrong because he was always very careful,” said Tolbert Nyenswah, an assistant health minister in Monrovia.

Amber Brantly and the children departed for a wedding in the U.S. just days before Brantly fell ill and quarantined himself.

They are currently staying with family in Abilene and, while not subject to quarantine, are monitoring their temperatures for an early sign of viral infection, a City of Abilene spokeswoman said.

Their return has sparked questions about whether they might introduce the infection to the U.S.

However, Stephan Monroe of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday that “Ebola poses little risk to the general U.S. population.”

Associated Press writers Betsy Blaney in Lubbock, Texas, and Ken Kusmer in Indianapolis contributed to this report.

Doctor who contracted Ebola in grave condition

KDWN

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Kent Brantly always wanted to be a medical missionary, and he took the work seriously, spending months treating a steady stream of patients with Ebola in Liberia.

Now Brantly is himself a patient, fighting for his own survival in an isolation unit on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia, after contracting the deadly disease.

The Texas-trained doctor says he is “terrified” of the disease progressing further, according to Dr. David Mcray, the director of maternal-child health at John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, where Brantly completed a four-year residency.

“I’m praying fervently that God will help me survive this disease,” Brantly said in an email Monday to Mcray. He also asked that prayers be extended for Nancy Writebol, an American co-worker who also has fallen ill.

Brantly “went into Ebola exhausted” from treating Ebola patients, Mcray said after speaking with him Monday. His prognosis is grave and efforts to evacuate him to Europe for treatment have been thwarted because of concerns expressed by countries he would have to fly over en route to any European destination, Mcray said.

There is no known cure for Ebola, which begins with symptoms including fever and sore throat and escalates to vomiting, diarrhea and internal bleeding. The disease spreads through direct contact with blood and other bodily fluids as well as indirect contact with “environments contaminated with such fluids,” according to the World Health Organization.

Still, colleagues and family members said Brantly, 33, knew of the risks associated with working in one of the world’s poorest countries during an epidemic and did not regret his choice.

“Kent prepared himself to be a lifetime medical missionary,” said his mother, Jan Brantly. “His heart is in Africa.”

Last October, Brantly began a two-year fellowship with Samaritan’s Purse, a Christian aid group, to serve as a general practitioner, delivering babies and performing surgeries at a mission hospital in the Monrovia suburb of Paynseville.

When Ebola spread from neighboring Guinea into Liberia, Brantly and his wife, Amber, re-evaluated their commitment, but decided to stay in West Africa with their children, ages 3 and 5.

Brantly directed the hospital’s Ebola clinic, wearing full-body protective gear in the Equatorial heat for upward of three hours at a time to treat patients.

He undertook humanitarian work while studying medicine at Indiana University, working in impoverished, inner-city neighborhoods, according to a medical school spokeswoman.

During his four-year family medicine residency, he accompanied Mcray on medical missions to Uganda and earthquake-devastated Haiti. He also spent several weeks working in Tanzania, where a cousin lives and works as a medical missionary, Mcray said.

Before contracting Ebola, Brantly and his family “really enjoyed Liberia.”

“They were very well-adjusted,” said Ken Kauffeldt, the country director for Samaritan’s Purse in Monrovia.

Liberia’s health ministry is investigating how Brantly contracted the virus.

“We’re trying to figure out what went wrong because he was always very careful,” said Tolbert Nyenswah, an assistant health minister in Monrovia.

Amber Brantly and the children departed for a wedding in the U.S. just days before Brantly fell ill and quarantined himself.

They are currently staying with family in Abilene and, while not subject to quarantine, are monitoring their temperatures for an early sign of viral infection, a City of Abilene spokeswoman said.

Their return has sparked questions about whether they might introduce the infection to the U.S.

However, Stephan Monroe of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday that “Ebola poses little risk to the general U.S. population.”

Associated Press writers Betsy Blaney in Lubbock, Texas, and Ken Kusmer in Indianapolis contributed to this report.

Doctor who contracted Ebola in grave condition

KDWN

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Kent Brantly always wanted to be a medical missionary, and he took the work seriously, spending months treating a steady stream of patients with Ebola in Liberia.

Now Brantly is himself a patient, fighting for his own survival in an isolation unit on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia, after contracting the deadly disease.

The Texas-trained doctor says he is “terrified” of the disease progressing further, according to Dr. David Mcray, the director of maternal-child health at John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, where Brantly completed a four-year residency.

“I’m praying fervently that God will help me survive this disease,” Brantly said in an email Monday to Mcray. He also asked that prayers be extended for Nancy Writebol, an American co-worker who also has fallen ill.

Brantly “went into Ebola exhausted” from treating Ebola patients, Mcray said after speaking with him Monday. His prognosis is grave and efforts to evacuate him to Europe for treatment have been thwarted because of concerns expressed by countries he would have to fly over en route to any European destination, Mcray said.

There is no known cure for Ebola, which begins with symptoms including fever and sore throat and escalates to vomiting, diarrhea and internal bleeding. The disease spreads through direct contact with blood and other bodily fluids as well as indirect contact with “environments contaminated with such fluids,” according to the World Health Organization.

Still, colleagues and family members said Brantly, 33, knew of the risks associated with working in one of the world’s poorest countries during an epidemic and did not regret his choice.

“Kent prepared himself to be a lifetime medical missionary,” said his mother, Jan Brantly. “His heart is in Africa.”

Last October, Brantly began a two-year fellowship with Samaritan’s Purse, a Christian aid group, to serve as a general practitioner, delivering babies and performing surgeries at a mission hospital in the Monrovia suburb of Paynseville.

When Ebola spread from neighboring Guinea into Liberia, Brantly and his wife, Amber, re-evaluated their commitment, but decided to stay in West Africa with their children, ages 3 and 5.

Brantly directed the hospital’s Ebola clinic, wearing full-body protective gear in the Equatorial heat for upward of three hours at a time to treat patients.

He undertook humanitarian work while studying medicine at Indiana University, working in impoverished, inner-city neighborhoods, according to a medical school spokeswoman.

During his four-year family medicine residency, he accompanied Mcray on medical missions to Uganda and earthquake-devastated Haiti. He also spent several weeks working in Tanzania, where a cousin lives and works as a medical missionary, Mcray said.

Before contracting Ebola, Brantly and his family “really enjoyed Liberia.”

“They were very well-adjusted,” said Ken Kauffeldt, the country director for Samaritan’s Purse in Monrovia.

Liberia’s health ministry is investigating how Brantly contracted the virus.

“We’re trying to figure out what went wrong because he was always very careful,” said Tolbert Nyenswah, an assistant health minister in Monrovia.

Amber Brantly and the children departed for a wedding in the U.S. just days before Brantly fell ill and quarantined himself.

They are currently staying with family in Abilene and, while not subject to quarantine, are monitoring their temperatures for an early sign of viral infection, a City of Abilene spokeswoman said.

Their return has sparked questions about whether they might introduce the infection to the U.S.

However, Stephan Monroe of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday that “Ebola poses little risk to the general U.S. population.”

Associated Press writers Betsy Blaney in Lubbock, Texas, and Ken Kusmer in Indianapolis contributed to this report.

Doctor who contracted Ebola in grave condition

KDWN

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Kent Brantly always wanted to be a medical missionary, and he took the work seriously, spending months treating a steady stream of patients with Ebola in Liberia.

Now Brantly is himself a patient, fighting for his own survival in an isolation unit on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia, after contracting the deadly disease.

The Texas-trained doctor says he is “terrified” of the disease progressing further, according to Dr. David Mcray, the director of maternal-child health at John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, where Brantly completed a four-year residency.

“I’m praying fervently that God will help me survive this disease,” Brantly said in an email Monday to Mcray. He also asked that prayers be extended for Nancy Writebol, an American co-worker who also has fallen ill.

Brantly “went into Ebola exhausted” from treating Ebola patients, Mcray said after speaking with him Monday. His prognosis is grave and efforts to evacuate him to Europe for treatment have been thwarted because of concerns expressed by countries he would have to fly over en route to any European destination, Mcray said.

There is no known cure for Ebola, which begins with symptoms including fever and sore throat and escalates to vomiting, diarrhea and internal bleeding. The disease spreads through direct contact with blood and other bodily fluids as well as indirect contact with “environments contaminated with such fluids,” according to the World Health Organization.

Still, colleagues and family members said Brantly, 33, knew of the risks associated with working in one of the world’s poorest countries during an epidemic and did not regret his choice.

“Kent prepared himself to be a lifetime medical missionary,” said his mother, Jan Brantly. “His heart is in Africa.”

Last October, Brantly began a two-year fellowship with Samaritan’s Purse, a Christian aid group, to serve as a general practitioner, delivering babies and performing surgeries at a mission hospital in the Monrovia suburb of Paynseville.

When Ebola spread from neighboring Guinea into Liberia, Brantly and his wife, Amber, re-evaluated their commitment, but decided to stay in West Africa with their children, ages 3 and 5.

Brantly directed the hospital’s Ebola clinic, wearing full-body protective gear in the Equatorial heat for upward of three hours at a time to treat patients.

He undertook humanitarian work while studying medicine at Indiana University, working in impoverished, inner-city neighborhoods, according to a medical school spokeswoman.

During his four-year family medicine residency, he accompanied Mcray on medical missions to Uganda and earthquake-devastated Haiti. He also spent several weeks working in Tanzania, where a cousin lives and works as a medical missionary, Mcray said.

Before contracting Ebola, Brantly and his family “really enjoyed Liberia.”

“They were very well-adjusted,” said Ken Kauffeldt, the country director for Samaritan’s Purse in Monrovia.

Liberia’s health ministry is investigating how Brantly contracted the virus.

“We’re trying to figure out what went wrong because he was always very careful,” said Tolbert Nyenswah, an assistant health minister in Monrovia.

Amber Brantly and the children departed for a wedding in the U.S. just days before Brantly fell ill and quarantined himself.

They are currently staying with family in Abilene and, while not subject to quarantine, are monitoring their temperatures for an early sign of viral infection, a City of Abilene spokeswoman said.

Their return has sparked questions about whether they might introduce the infection to the U.S.

However, Stephan Monroe of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday that “Ebola poses little risk to the general U.S. population.”

Associated Press writers Betsy Blaney in Lubbock, Texas, and Ken Kusmer in Indianapolis contributed to this report.

Doctor who contracted Ebola in grave condition

KDWN

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Kent Brantly always wanted to be a medical missionary, and he took the work seriously, spending months treating a steady stream of patients with Ebola in Liberia.

Now Brantly is himself a patient, fighting for his own survival in an isolation unit on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia, after contracting the deadly disease.

The Texas-trained doctor says he is “terrified” of the disease progressing further, according to Dr. David Mcray, the director of maternal-child health at John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, where Brantly completed a four-year residency.

“I’m praying fervently that God will help me survive this disease,” Brantly said in an email Monday to Mcray. He also asked that prayers be extended for Nancy Writebol, an American co-worker who also has fallen ill.

Brantly “went into Ebola exhausted” from treating Ebola patients, Mcray said after speaking with him Monday. His prognosis is grave and efforts to evacuate him to Europe for treatment have been thwarted because of concerns expressed by countries he would have to fly over en route to any European destination, Mcray said.

There is no known cure for Ebola, which begins with symptoms including fever and sore throat and escalates to vomiting, diarrhea and internal bleeding. The disease spreads through direct contact with blood and other bodily fluids as well as indirect contact with “environments contaminated with such fluids,” according to the World Health Organization.

Still, colleagues and family members said Brantly, 33, knew of the risks associated with working in one of the world’s poorest countries during an epidemic and did not regret his choice.

“Kent prepared himself to be a lifetime medical missionary,” said his mother, Jan Brantly. “His heart is in Africa.”

Last October, Brantly began a two-year fellowship with Samaritan’s Purse, a Christian aid group, to serve as a general practitioner, delivering babies and performing surgeries at a mission hospital in the Monrovia suburb of Paynseville.

When Ebola spread from neighboring Guinea into Liberia, Brantly and his wife, Amber, re-evaluated their commitment, but decided to stay in West Africa with their children, ages 3 and 5.

Brantly directed the hospital’s Ebola clinic, wearing full-body protective gear in the Equatorial heat for upward of three hours at a time to treat patients.

He undertook humanitarian work while studying medicine at Indiana University, working in impoverished, inner-city neighborhoods, according to a medical school spokeswoman.

During his four-year family medicine residency, he accompanied Mcray on medical missions to Uganda and earthquake-devastated Haiti. He also spent several weeks working in Tanzania, where a cousin lives and works as a medical missionary, Mcray said.

Before contracting Ebola, Brantly and his family “really enjoyed Liberia.”

“They were very well-adjusted,” said Ken Kauffeldt, the country director for Samaritan’s Purse in Monrovia.

Liberia’s health ministry is investigating how Brantly contracted the virus.

“We’re trying to figure out what went wrong because he was always very careful,” said Tolbert Nyenswah, an assistant health minister in Monrovia.

Amber Brantly and the children departed for a wedding in the U.S. just days before Brantly fell ill and quarantined himself.

They are currently staying with family in Abilene and, while not subject to quarantine, are monitoring their temperatures for an early sign of viral infection, a City of Abilene spokeswoman said.

Their return has sparked questions about whether they might introduce the infection to the U.S.

However, Stephan Monroe of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday that “Ebola poses little risk to the general U.S. population.”

Associated Press writers Betsy Blaney in Lubbock, Texas, and Ken Kusmer in Indianapolis contributed to this report.

Doctor who contracted Ebola in grave condition

KDWN

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Kent Brantly always wanted to be a medical missionary, and he took the work seriously, spending months treating a steady stream of patients with Ebola in Liberia.

Now Brantly is himself a patient, fighting for his own survival in an isolation unit on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia, after contracting the deadly disease.

The Texas-trained doctor says he is “terrified” of the disease progressing further, according to Dr. David Mcray, the director of maternal-child health at John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, where Brantly completed a four-year residency.

“I’m praying fervently that God will help me survive this disease,” Brantly said in an email Monday to Mcray. He also asked that prayers be extended for Nancy Writebol, an American co-worker who also has fallen ill.

Brantly “went into Ebola exhausted” from treating Ebola patients, Mcray said after speaking with him Monday. His prognosis is grave and efforts to evacuate him to Europe for treatment have been thwarted because of concerns expressed by countries he would have to fly over en route to any European destination, Mcray said.

There is no known cure for Ebola, which begins with symptoms including fever and sore throat and escalates to vomiting, diarrhea and internal bleeding. The disease spreads through direct contact with blood and other bodily fluids as well as indirect contact with “environments contaminated with such fluids,” according to the World Health Organization.

Still, colleagues and family members said Brantly, 33, knew of the risks associated with working in one of the world’s poorest countries during an epidemic and did not regret his choice.

“Kent prepared himself to be a lifetime medical missionary,” said his mother, Jan Brantly. “His heart is in Africa.”

Last October, Brantly began a two-year fellowship with Samaritan’s Purse, a Christian aid group, to serve as a general practitioner, delivering babies and performing surgeries at a mission hospital in the Monrovia suburb of Paynseville.

When Ebola spread from neighboring Guinea into Liberia, Brantly and his wife, Amber, re-evaluated their commitment, but decided to stay in West Africa with their children, ages 3 and 5.

Brantly directed the hospital’s Ebola clinic, wearing full-body protective gear in the Equatorial heat for upward of three hours at a time to treat patients.

He undertook humanitarian work while studying medicine at Indiana University, working in impoverished, inner-city neighborhoods, according to a medical school spokeswoman.

During his four-year family medicine residency, he accompanied Mcray on medical missions to Uganda and earthquake-devastated Haiti. He also spent several weeks working in Tanzania, where a cousin lives and works as a medical missionary, Mcray said.

Before contracting Ebola, Brantly and his family “really enjoyed Liberia.”

“They were very well-adjusted,” said Ken Kauffeldt, the country director for Samaritan’s Purse in Monrovia.

Liberia’s health ministry is investigating how Brantly contracted the virus.

“We’re trying to figure out what went wrong because he was always very careful,” said Tolbert Nyenswah, an assistant health minister in Monrovia.

Amber Brantly and the children departed for a wedding in the U.S. just days before Brantly fell ill and quarantined himself.

They are currently staying with family in Abilene and, while not subject to quarantine, are monitoring their temperatures for an early sign of viral infection, a City of Abilene spokeswoman said.

Their return has sparked questions about whether they might introduce the infection to the U.S.

However, Stephan Monroe of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday that “Ebola poses little risk to the general U.S. population.”

Associated Press writers Betsy Blaney in Lubbock, Texas, and Ken Kusmer in Indianapolis contributed to this report.

Doctor who contracted Ebola in grave condition

KDWN

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Kent Brantly always wanted to be a medical missionary, and he took the work seriously, spending months treating a steady stream of patients with Ebola in Liberia.

Now Brantly is himself a patient, fighting for his own survival in an isolation unit on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia after contracting the deadly disease.

The Texas-trained doctor says he is “terrified” of the disease progressing further, according to Dr. David Mcray, the director of maternal-child health at John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, where Brantly completed a four-year residency.

“I’m praying fervently that God will help me survive this disease,” Brantly said in an email Monday to Mcray. He also asked that prayers be extended for Nancy Writebol, an American co-worker who also has fallen ill.

Brantly “went into Ebola exhausted” from treating Ebola patients, Mcray said after speaking with him Monday. His prognosis is grave and efforts to evacuate him to Europe for treatment have been thwarted as Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has closed border crossings.

There is no known cure for Ebola, which begins with symptoms including fever and sore throat and escalates to vomiting, diarrhea and internal bleeding. The disease spreads through direct contact with blood and other bodily fluids as well as indirect contact with “environments contaminated with such fluids,” according to the World Health Organization.

Still, colleagues and family members said Brantly, 33, knew of the risks associated with working in one of the world’s poorest countries during an epidemic and did not regret his choice.

“Kent prepared himself to be a lifetime medical missionary,” said his mother, Jan Brantly. “His heart is in Africa.”

Last October, Brantly began a two-year fellowship with Samaritan’s Purse, a Christian aid group, to serve as a general practitioner, delivering babies and performing surgeries at a mission hospital in the Monrovia suburb of Paynseville.

When Ebola spread from neighboring Guinea into Liberia, Brantly and his wife, Amber, re-evaluated their commitment, but decided to stay in West Africa with their children, ages 3 and 5.

Brantly directed the hospital’s Ebola clinic, wearing full-body protective gear in the Equatorial heat for upward of three hours at a time to treat patients.

He undertook humanitarian work while studying medicine at Indiana University, working in impoverished, inner-city neighborhoods, according to a medical school spokeswoman.

During his four-year family medicine residency, he accompanied Mcray on medical missions to Uganda and earthquake-devastated Haiti. He also spent several weeks working in Tanzania, where a cousin lives and works as a medical missionary, Mcray said.

Before contracting Ebola, Brantly and his family “really enjoyed Liberia.”

“They were very well-adjusted,” said Ken Kauffeldt, the country director for Samaritan’s Purse in Monrovia.

Liberia’s health ministry is investigating how Brantly contracted the virus.

“We’re trying to figure out what went wrong because he was always very careful,” said Tolbert Nyenswah, an assistant health minister in Monrovia.

Amber Brantly and the children departed for a wedding in the U.S. just days before Brantly fell ill and quarantined himself.

They are currently staying with family in Abilene and, while not subject to quarantine, are monitoring their temperatures for an early sign of viral infection, a City of Abilene spokeswoman said.

Associated Press writers Betsy Blaney in Lubbock, Texas, and Ken Kusmer in Indianapolis contributed to this report.

Doctor who contracted Ebola in grave condition

KDWN

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Kent Brantly always wanted to be a medical missionary, and he took the work seriously, spending months treating a steady stream of patients with Ebola in Liberia.

Now Brantly is himself a patient, fighting for his own survival in an isolation unit on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia after contracting the deadly disease.

The Texas-trained doctor says he is “terrified” of the disease progressing further, according to Dr. David Mcray, the director of maternal-child health at John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, where Brantly completed a four-year residency.

“I’m praying fervently that God will help me survive this disease,” Brantly said in an email Monday to Mcray. He also asked that prayers be extended for Nancy Writebol, an American co-worker who also has fallen ill.

Brantly “went into Ebola exhausted” from treating Ebola patients, Mcray said after speaking with him Monday. His prognosis is grave and efforts to evacuate him to Europe for treatment have been thwarted as Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has closed border crossings.

There is no known cure for Ebola, which begins with symptoms including fever and sore throat and escalates to vomiting, diarrhea and internal bleeding. The disease spreads through direct contact with blood and other bodily fluids as well as indirect contact with “environments contaminated with such fluids,” according to the World Health Organization.

Still, colleagues and family members said Brantly, 33, knew of the risks associated with working in one of the world’s poorest countries during an epidemic and did not regret his choice.

“Kent prepared himself to be a lifetime medical missionary,” said his mother, Jan Brantly. “His heart is in Africa.”

Last October, Brantly began a two-year fellowship with Samaritan’s Purse, a Christian aid group, to serve as a general practitioner, delivering babies and performing surgeries at a mission hospital in the Monrovia suburb of Paynseville.

When Ebola spread from neighboring Guinea into Liberia, Brantly and his wife, Amber, re-evaluated their commitment, but decided to stay in West Africa with their children, ages 3 and 5.

Brantly directed the hospital’s Ebola clinic, wearing full-body protective gear in the Equatorial heat for upward of three hours at a time to treat patients.

He undertook humanitarian work while studying medicine at Indiana University, working in impoverished, inner-city neighborhoods, according to a medical school spokeswoman.

During his four-year family medicine residency, he accompanied Mcray on medical missions to Uganda and earthquake-devastated Haiti. He also spent several weeks working in Tanzania, where a cousin lives and works as a medical missionary, Mcray said.

Before contracting Ebola, Brantly and his family “really enjoyed Liberia.”

“They were very well-adjusted,” said Ken Kauffeldt, the country director for Samaritan’s Purse in Monrovia.

Liberia’s health ministry is investigating how Brantly contracted the virus.

“We’re trying to figure out what went wrong because he was always very careful,” said Tolbert Nyenswah, an assistant health minister in Monrovia.

Amber Brantly and the children departed for a wedding in the U.S. just days before Brantly fell ill and quarantined himself.

They are currently staying with family in Abilene and, while not subject to quarantine, are monitoring their temperatures for an early sign of viral infection, a City of Abilene spokeswoman said.

Associated Press writers Betsy Blaney in Lubbock, Texas, and Ken Kusmer in Indianapolis contributed to this report.

Doctor who contracted Ebola in grave condition

KDWN

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — An American doctor who contracted the Ebola virus felt a deep calling to work in Liberia and was exhausted after months of treating patients with the deadly disease.

Kent Brantly’s mother, Jan Brantly, says her 33-year-old son’s “heart is in Africa.” She says he comes from a long line of physicians and missionaries.

The director of maternal-child health at JPS Health Network where Brantly completed his residency just months before heading to West Africa has been in touch by phone and email.

Dr. David Mcray says Brantly had been working for months when he contracted the disease. Mcray says Brantly has told him he is “terrified.”

Mcray says Brantly’s prognosis is grave. The doctor is suffering fever, headache and abdominal pain in an isolation unit for Ebola patients on the outskirts of Liberia’s capital.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP’s earlier story is below.

Two American aid workers have tested positive for the Ebola virus while working to combat an outbreak of the deadly disease at a hospital in Liberia, a relief group official said.

Ken Isaacs, a vice president of Samaritan’s Purse, told The Associated Press on Sunday that Dr. Kent Brantly, the 33-year-old medical director for the group’s Ebola care center on the outskirts of the Liberian capital of Monrovia, was stable and in very serious condition.

“We are hopeful and prayerful,” Isaacs told AP by telephone from the group headquarters in Boone, North Carolina. He said the doctor quickly recognized the symptoms and sought speedy treatment.

Isaacs identified the second American, Nancy Writebol, as a worker with an allied aid group SIM, or Serving in Mission, which runs the hospital where Samaritan’s Purse has an Ebola care center on the grounds. He said she was in stable and serious condition.

“She is showing full symptoms of the disease,” Isaacs said. He added that Writebol had been working as a hygienist who decontaminated those entering and leaving the Ebola care area at the hospital.

He said both Americans have since been isolated and are under intensive treatment.

Isaacs said the fact that health care workers have been infected underscores the severity of the West Africa outbreak that has killed hundreds in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.

“It’s been a shock to everyone on our team to have two of our players get pounded with the disease,” said Isaacs, adding that health ministries in those poor nations are challenged to respond. “Our team is frankly getting tired.”

The highly contagious virus is one of the most deadly diseases in the world. The World Health Organization said the outbreak is the largest ever recorded, killing more than 670 people in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone since it began earlier this year.

Health workers are at serious risk of contracting the disease, which spreads through contact with bodily fluids.

Photos of Brantly working in Liberia show him in white coveralls made of a synthetic material that he wore for hours a day while treating Ebola patients.

There is no known cure for Ebola, which begins with symptoms including fever and sore throat and escalates to vomiting, diarrhea and internal and external bleeding. The WHO says the disease is not contagious until a person begins to show symptoms.

Brantly’s wife and children had been living with him in Liberia but flew home to the U.S. about a week ago, before the doctor started showing any signs of illness, said Melissa Strickland, a spokeswoman for Samaritan’s Purse.

“They have absolutely shown no symptoms,” she said.

A woman who identified herself as Brantly’s mother said the family was declining immediate comment when reached by phone in Indiana late Saturday.

Brantly is a graduate of Indiana University School of Medicine and went to Liberia as part of a two-year fellowship with Samaritan’s Purse, shortly after he completed his residency in family medicine at John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, Texas.

“The caliber of a person like that who says, `I’m going Africa. I’m going to where people need me the most,’ it really speaks to you,” Robert Earley, president and CEO of JPS Health Network, said Sunday. “It speaks to your heart.”

John Munro, pastor of Calvary Church in Charlotte, North Carolina – which sponsors the Writebols’ work as missionaries – said he told his congregation the news Sunday.

Munro said Writebol’s husband David told an elder in the church via Skype on Saturday that she was very sick and he couldn’t even enter the same room with her.

Munro said some church members had offered several months ago to pay to fly the Writebols back to the U.S. because of the Ebola outbreak but they refused because they felt God had called them to work there. He broke the news to the congregation Sunday morning.

“These are real heroes – people who do things quietly behind the scenes, people with a very strong vocation and very strong faith,” Munro said.

He said the couple has worked as missionaries since the 1990s and previously worked in an orphanage in Zambia, adding they left for Liberia just under a year ago.

Associated Press writer Colleen Slevin in Denver, Colorado, contributed to this report.

Doctor who contracted Ebola in grave condition

KDWN

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — An American doctor who contracted the Ebola virus felt a deep calling to work in Liberia and was exhausted after months of treating patients with the deadly disease.

Kent Brantly’s mother, Jan Brantly, says her 33-year-old son’s “heart is in Africa.” She says he comes from a long line of physicians and missionaries.

The director of maternal-child health at JPS Health Network where Brantly completed his residency just months before heading to West Africa has been in touch by phone and email.

Dr. David Mcray says Brantly had been working for months when he contracted the disease. Mcray says Brantly has told him he is “terrified.”

Mcray says Brantly’s prognosis is grave. The doctor is suffering fever, headache and abdominal pain in an isolation unit for Ebola patients on the outskirts of Liberia’s capital.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP’s earlier story is below.

Two American aid workers have tested positive for the Ebola virus while working to combat an outbreak of the deadly disease at a hospital in Liberia, a relief group official said.

Ken Isaacs, a vice president of Samaritan’s Purse, told The Associated Press on Sunday that Dr. Kent Brantly, the 33-year-old medical director for the group’s Ebola care center on the outskirts of the Liberian capital of Monrovia, was stable and in very serious condition.

“We are hopeful and prayerful,” Isaacs told AP by telephone from the group headquarters in Boone, North Carolina. He said the doctor quickly recognized the symptoms and sought speedy treatment.

Isaacs identified the second American, Nancy Writebol, as a worker with an allied aid group SIM, or Serving in Mission, which runs the hospital where Samaritan’s Purse has an Ebola care center on the grounds. He said she was in stable and serious condition.

“She is showing full symptoms of the disease,” Isaacs said. He added that Writebol had been working as a hygienist who decontaminated those entering and leaving the Ebola care area at the hospital.

He said both Americans have since been isolated and are under intensive treatment.

Isaacs said the fact that health care workers have been infected underscores the severity of the West Africa outbreak that has killed hundreds in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.

“It’s been a shock to everyone on our team to have two of our players get pounded with the disease,” said Isaacs, adding that health ministries in those poor nations are challenged to respond. “Our team is frankly getting tired.”

The highly contagious virus is one of the most deadly diseases in the world. The World Health Organization said the outbreak is the largest ever recorded, killing more than 670 people in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone since it began earlier this year.

Health workers are at serious risk of contracting the disease, which spreads through contact with bodily fluids.

Photos of Brantly working in Liberia show him in white coveralls made of a synthetic material that he wore for hours a day while treating Ebola patients.

There is no known cure for Ebola, which begins with symptoms including fever and sore throat and escalates to vomiting, diarrhea and internal and external bleeding. The WHO says the disease is not contagious until a person begins to show symptoms.

Brantly’s wife and children had been living with him in Liberia but flew home to the U.S. about a week ago, before the doctor started showing any signs of illness, said Melissa Strickland, a spokeswoman for Samaritan’s Purse.

“They have absolutely shown no symptoms,” she said.

A woman who identified herself as Brantly’s mother said the family was declining immediate comment when reached by phone in Indiana late Saturday.

Brantly is a graduate of Indiana University School of Medicine and went to Liberia as part of a two-year fellowship with Samaritan’s Purse, shortly after he completed his residency in family medicine at John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, Texas.

“The caliber of a person like that who says, `I’m going Africa. I’m going to where people need me the most,’ it really speaks to you,” Robert Earley, president and CEO of JPS Health Network, said Sunday. “It speaks to your heart.”

John Munro, pastor of Calvary Church in Charlotte, North Carolina – which sponsors the Writebols’ work as missionaries – said he told his congregation the news Sunday.

Munro said Writebol’s husband David told an elder in the church via Skype on Saturday that she was very sick and he couldn’t even enter the same room with her.

Munro said some church members had offered several months ago to pay to fly the Writebols back to the U.S. because of the Ebola outbreak but they refused because they felt God had called them to work there. He broke the news to the congregation Sunday morning.

“These are real heroes – people who do things quietly behind the scenes, people with a very strong vocation and very strong faith,” Munro said.

He said the couple has worked as missionaries since the 1990s and previously worked in an orphanage in Zambia, adding they left for Liberia just under a year ago.

Associated Press writer Colleen Slevin in Denver, Colorado, contributed to this report.