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Pakistan: Karachi airport training center attacked

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KARACHI, Pakistan (AP) — Gunmen in Pakistan attacked a training facility near the Karachi airport on Tuesday, a spokesman said.

Pakistani television stations showed images of security guards rushing to the scene and frantically taking up positions behind buildings or earthen berms around the facility, which serves as a training center for airport security personnel. The facility is roughly one kilometer (half mile) from the Karachi international airport.

The attack began as at least two groups of gunmen tried to enter the facility from two different entrances, said Ghulam Abbas Memon, a spokesman for the Airport Security Force. The security forces were fighting them back, he said. Memon did not know how many attackers were involved or whether there were any casualties.

Details were sketchy and no one immediately claimed responsibility for Tuesday’s attack.

The firefight came on the heels of a brazen siege by the Taliban who on Sunday night stormed Karachi’s Jinnah International Airport in an attack that killed 36 people, including the 10 Taliban gunmen. At least 11 members of the Airport Security Force were killed during that attack.

The Civil Aviation Authority, which is responsible for running the country’s airports, said in its Twitter feed that all flights at the Karachi international airport have been suspended because the academy for the ASF was under attack.

The organization called on people to be calm and patient.

Pakistan: Karachi airport training center attacked

KDWN

KARACHI, Pakistan (AP) — Gunmen in Pakistan attacked a training facility near the Karachi airport on Tuesday, a spokesman said.

Pakistani television stations showed images of security guards rushing to the scene and frantically taking up positions behind buildings or earthen berms around the facility, which serves as a training center for airport security personnel. The facility is roughly one kilometer (half mile) from the Karachi international airport.

The attack began as at least two groups of gunmen tried to enter the facility from two different entrances, said Ghulam Abbas Memon, a spokesman for the Airport Security Force. The security forces were fighting them back, he said. Memon did not know how many attackers were involved or whether there were any casualties.

Details were sketchy and no one immediately claimed responsibility for Tuesday’s attack.

The firefight came on the heels of a brazen siege by the Taliban who on Sunday night stormed Karachi’s Jinnah International Airport in an attack that killed 36 people, including the 10 Taliban gunmen. At least 11 members of the Airport Security Force were killed during that attack.

The Civil Aviation Authority, which is responsible for running the country’s airports, said in its Twitter feed that all flights at the Karachi international airport have been suspended because the academy for the ASF was under attack.

The organization called on people to be calm and patient.

Pakistan: Karachi airport training center attacked

KDWN

KARACHI, Pakistan (AP) — A Pakistani spokesman says militants have attacked a security training facility at the Karachi airport and that a firefight is underway with the attackers.

Ghulam Abbas Memon, a spokesman for the Airport Security Force, says gunmen tried to enter the facility from two different entrances on Tuesday but the security forces were fighting them back.

Memon says he doesn’t have any details on the number of attackers or possible casualties.

The attack comes less than two days after gunmen laid siege to the Karachi airport in an attack that left 36 people dead, including 10 Taliban gunmen.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP’s earlier story is below.

Pakistani authorities found seven bodies in a burned building at the Karachi airport Tuesday of people who had , bringing the death toll from the attack there to 36, including the 10 Taliban attackers, officials said, raising questions about why officials didn’t find the bodies sooner.

The news came as the Pakistani military pounded targets in the northwest tribal region near the Afghan border earlier in the day, killing 25 militants, the army said.

The discovery of the bodies, roughly a day after Pakistani officials said the airport had been secured, is sure to raise more questions about security at the country’s busiest airport.

The remains of the seven victims were brought to Karachi’s Jinnah Hospital on Tuesday morning, said Dr. Seemi Jamali. They were charred beyond recognition, said the head of the Karachi Municipal Corporation, Rauf Akhtar Farooqi.

The bodies were found in a burned building in the airport, inside a cold storage unit but it was unclear how they got there or who they were. Pakistani media were reporting that the seven were airport workers who had hidden inside the unit from the fighting but got trapped and burned to death.

The morgue at Jinnah Hospital was a frantic scene as family members of the seven people claimed their remains.

“He called us … and said `Mummy, terrorists attacked and we are going to hide. Pray for us,'” said Zainab Lakhan, whose brother was found in the storage unit.

A group of 10 militants, some disguised as police, attacked the airport on Sunday night and battled with Pakistani forces for roughly five hours before the Karachi airport siege was over. The Pakistani Taliban later claimed responsibility for the attack and vowed more violence.

The Pakistani Taliban has been trying to overthrow the government and establish its hard-line rule across the country. The government of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has tried repeatedly to negotiate with the militants to end the fighting but those efforts have gone off the rails in recent weeks.

The airport attack, coming against a high-profile target in a city vital to the country’s economy, has raised questions about whether Sharif will continue to pursue the negotiations policy or choose a more aggressive, military response.

Associated Press writers Rebecca Santana and Asif Shahzad in Islamabad contributed to this report.